The People's Library of Occupy Vancouver

Equity, Access and Openness (@OccVanLibrary)

Check out our new Branch Library at the Dharma Lab!

Check out our branch library at The Dharma Lab, on the second floor of 1814 Pandora St!

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Happy Holidays from The People’s Library

We now have THREE donation and book return locations!

We know a lot of you have been eager to return books and drop off donations for the People’s Library, and now you can!

Three of our dearest local bookstores have kindly offered to share their space with us. Just look for our drop-off bins located in the store, and look for us at the next Occupy Vancouver event!

Spartacus Books

…and…

People’s Co-op

…and…

Little Sister’s Bookstore!
Thanks for reading!

Lessons from the 1960s: An Essay by Andrew Feenberg

The PDF file can be downloaded here

What can the Occupy Movement learn from the 60s? How did the New Left fail to mobilize a mass base? How did sectarianism divide them into weaker and weaker factions? Why could not they effect the changes they set out to make? Santayana says: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” Therefore let us take a look at history and heed the warning.

Professor Andrew Feenberg provided an analytical account of the New Left Movement, as both a witness and an active participant. This essay, Paths to Failure: The Dialectics of Organization and Ideology in the New Left, is not only informative but also insightful. His dissection of psychological, emotional, as well as ideological pitfalls will have a sobering effect on enthusiastic members of any civil rights movement who wish to learn from the past.

The PDF file can be downloaded here

This article was submitted by Librarian Amy.  Thank you, Amy!

Susan Lambert of the BC Teachers Federation at Occupy Vancouver

Required Reading: The Fraser Institute and Canada’s Conservative Evolution

This week, The People’s Library spotlights Donald Gutstein’s Not a Conspiracy Theory: How Business Propaganda Hijacks Democracy. 

“Do you ever wonder why so many of the Fraser Institute’s right-wing commentaries get into Canadian daily newspapers? Perhaps you’ve been disturbed by the spate of articles about the inevitability of Canada forming closer ties with the United States. Maybe you’re troubled by the constant media attacks on medicare or on the scientific consensus about global warming. In Not a Conspiracy Theory: How Business Propaganda Hijacks Democracy, former SFU communications professor and occasional Straight contributor Donald Gutstein explains how Canadians are being duped by a sophisticated, broad-ranging, and reactionary public-relations assault financed by some of North America’s largest corporations.”

Read the full review at The Georgia Strait

Find at Vancouver Public Library ❤

For The Pirate Bay click here

For Google Books click here

Why Occupy Vancouver became a Tent City and Lost the 99%

The following is a personal statement by one of the Librarians. The views expressed herein do not represent those of The People’s Library or Occupy Vancouver.

One Occupier takes a mid-day rest at The Library while another browses the collection

Occupy Vancouver has gotten a lot of flack for its tent city, but don’t blame us for that. Five thousand people descended on the Vancouver Art Gallery on October 15th because they were fed up with the status-quo. They consisted of young, old, students and trade unionists. They all had one thing in common: the growing economy has left them behind.

That’s because our economy is entirely based on unsustainable development. Vancouver’s celebrated urban policy is based on building and tearing down glass curtain condos that last 5-25 years. This is not a model of development worth exporting, and its bound to collapse. It’s also only a matter of time until anaemia from open-net fish farms will collapse Pacific salmon stocks, and tar sands tankers destroy the natural beauty and ecological wealth we have in Western Canada. These projects are negative-sum games that benefit a few large developers and corporations, (Canada’s and Hong  Kong’s 1%) while causing ecological and economic devastation for the multitude of small businesses and communities dealing with the externalities! (Our 99%)

It’s an economy that has created what Vancouver Magazine calls “Generation F”: a mass exodus of talented, educated young people on the losing end of Vancouver’s housing bubble. Its an economy that has deprived our First Nations of their traditional lifestyles, forcing them off their reserves. It’s also an economy that has put thousands of people out on the street.

It may be true that a number of homeless took advantage of the free food, medical services and security that came with the Occupy Vancouver site–but what do you expect in the homeless capital of Canada?  What do you expect from the city that tears down more social housing than it builds? What do you expect from a city whose government has reduced its social housing mandate for mega-developments to 0%?

The tent city wasn’t a creation of Occupy Vancouver’s organisers. I think more than anything, it speaks to the selflessness of the hundreds of volunteers that put their own pet projects on hold to advocate for the desperate need of the angry, bitter and hurt people that showed up at our protest and demanded a piece of our public space to inarticulately air their grievances.

Our critics tell us that the system isn’t broken, that you can still get things done by writing an email to your MLA. Explain that to the guy washing the windows at your favourite coffee shop some time. I’m sure he’ll be relieved to hear it. And unless you count the window washers who shine the “glass city” day after day, I think you’ll find, as we have, that the wealth has not “trickled down.”

Why did Occupy Vancouver get taken over by homeless? Don’t blame the city for scaling back social housing. It must have been the anarchists.

Protesters Plan to Occupy Little Mountain Housing Project

Little Mountain was one of the most successful public housing projects ever built. Known for its safety, the design of Little Mountain allowed neighbors to keep an eye on each other, while common areas created a space where neighbors could meet and share the burden of childcare.

Truly, it was a model of successful planning. It was one that many in the planning field believed should have been replicated around the world, if the Province hadn’t sold the land to a developer.

It was mostly demolished in 2009. Since this much-loved social housing project was destroyed, the developer has built nothing to replace it. The residents, including many elderly, have all been relocated. Demonstrators will be occupying the grounds today, risking arrest.

Literature on Little Mountain will be available in our library as soon as we re-launch.

The Future of the Occupy Movement with Michael Stone

A brilliant speech with Michael Stone at Occupy Vancouver